International Assistance to Countries Emerging from Conflict

TitleInternational Assistance to Countries Emerging from Conflict
Publication TypeBook
Subtitle / Series TitleA Review of Fifteen Years of Interventions and the Future of Peacebuilding
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsCutillo, A
Number of Pages75 pp.
PublisherInternational Peace Academy, Policy Paper - The Security-Development Nexus Program,
Accession Number728
Abstract

The end of the Cold War and the spirit of cooperation which prevailed in the early 1990s within the Security Council provided the international community with a historic opportunity to address the number of violent conflicts - and particularly internal conflicts - which had been steadily increasing since the end of World War II. A lively debate on ways and means to improve peacebuilding has been going on for several years within many different fora, including the UN Security Council, the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), the Group of Eight (G8) nations, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and the European Union (EU), as well as among academics and practitioners. The debate peaked with the presentation, in December 2004, of the report of the High-level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change. The Panel put forward several proposals on peacebuilding that formed the basis for decisions taken at the UN World Summit in September 2005. In the meantime, several donor governments have been reshaping their approach to post-conflict assistance in the last few years.This paper reviews the debate and how it has translated into operational developments in the field, focusing on the main problems and gaps that have emerged so far. The final sections focus on the decisions endorsed by the World Summit and their likely impact on the ground.The paper starts with an introduction to the concept of peacebuilding and how it has emerged in the last decade of the twentieth century. The next three chapters examine in sequence three fundamental questions: who should assume political leadership; who should be in charge of the coordination of different actors; and which financing mechanisms should be adopted for peacebuilding.

URLhttp://www.ipacademy.org/pdfs/Cutillo_E_RPT.pdf
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